Inspirations

Ode(s) to Savoir-Faire

Combining with virtuosity the art of haute couture and precious crafts, countless examples of exceptional savoir-faire helped bring the collection’s creations to life. Case in point a Denim shirt (look 7) in a chain print with a subtle blurring effect inspired by Kasuri techniques, a Japanese handicraft also used in the Lyonnais weaving tradition that was already celebrated by Monsieur Dior. Elsewhere, a shirt with a supple, stretch hand made entirely from tulle embroidered with beads required more than 2,600 hours of embroidery and took four days to assemble in our atelier. These innovative techniques magnify the boundless creative vision of Kim Jones, bringing a new energy infused with lightness and modernity.

    Riding the Wave

    The Dior signature is revisited in a “psychedelic surf” version – dreamt up by the artist and designer Shawn Stussy as an echo of the decor of the Miami show - notably on knits painstakingly crafted by hand to tease out ultra-precise motifs. Like the show’s opening silhouette, these upbeat colourful creations are worn over two layered shirts - one in cotton poplin, the other in a transparent technical nylon – paired with white jersey shorts, revisiting both relaxed sportswear influences and classic codes. Plaid jacquard accents finish off the looks.

      Tutti Frutti

      The Dior Oblique pattern is revisited in new subtle shades on both the show’s silhouettes and the new accessories, infusing an elegant lightness into this iconic signature created by Marc Bohan in 1967, and still produced in Flanders to this day. The graceful vintage print is at once exalted and modernised.

        The Art of the Detail

        Buttons delicately covered in fabric - one of the codes of the iconic Bar jacket, the eternal symbol of the New Look - punctuate, with their instantly recognisable signature, all of the show’s jackets (with the exception of a blazer-coat): from belted safari jackets to Dior Oblique suits and sumptuously light cashmere coats. Cuffs are occasionally turned back to reveal refined linings, blending elegance with the art of movement.

          Photo credit - Jackie Nickerson